Click to enlargeIntroduction to SIP<br>IP Telephony Systems<a name="top">

Technology Basics, Services, Economics, and Installation

Authors: Lawrence Harte, David Bowler

Number of Pages: 144
Number of Diagrams: 70
Copyright: 2004


Printed or Electronic Version (9.9MB) Available - Electronic Version has Color Diagrams




This book explains why people and companies are using SIP equipment and software to efficiently upgrade existing telephone systems, develop their own advanced communications services, and to more easily integrate telephone network with company information systems.

SIP technology is a well-established standardized communication protocol that has many low cost devices and software application development tools available. The use of SIP product and software allows companies to cost-effectively upgrade and eventually replace existing (legacy) telephone systems with more cost effective more....

Sample Diagrams

There are 70 explanatory diagrams in this book

Gateway Management

This figure shows how gateway manager software can be used to configure and manage gateways that connect the SIP network to other networks such as the public switched telephone network. This example shows how the gateway manager contains the configuration information for the gateway including IP address, capabilities such as speech coders, protocols, and access control information.

IP Centrex System

This figure shows a basic IP Centrex system that allows a local exchange company (LEC) in New York City to provide Centrex services to a company in Los Angeles. In this diagram, the LEC in New York City uses a class 5 switch to provide for plain old telephone (POTS) and Centrex services to their local customers. The Centrex software is installed in the switch and existing Centrex customers in the local area continue to connect their telephone stations directly to the Class 5 switch. To provide Centrex services to new customers located outside the geographic area, the LEC has installed a network gateway in New York that can communicate with the customer gateway in Los Angeles. Because the network gateway converts all the necessary signaling commands to control and communicate with the customer gateway, the class 5 switch does not care if the customer gateway is in Los Angeles or Tokyo. It simply provides the Centrex services as the users request.

Voice over Data (VoIP) Sharing Bandwidth

This figure shows how a data network shares bandwidth for both voice and data communications. This diagram shows that a single router is providing data communications service to IP telephones and computer workstations. In this example, a computer workstation is transferring a large file and the IP telephone is continuously sending a small amount of data (90 kbps). Because the LAN data network (Ethernet) has a maximum packet size of 1500 bytes of data and a standard high-speed data transmission rate of 100 Mbps, the router automatically divides the large file into smaller data blocks and access is shared between the IP telephone and the computer workstation. When the data packets arrive at the relatively low-speed WAN connection, congestion can occur. If congestion were to occur, the router connected to the WAN connection would begin to delay the transmission of packets. In this example, the WAN router gives priority to the voice over data network packets and delays the file transfer packets.


Table of Contents

CHAPTER 1 - Introduction to SIP

- Basic VoIP Operation
- SIP System Overview
- Communication Services
- Private Telephone Systems
- Information Systems
- Network Management
- Communication System Economics
- SIP Evolution

CHAPTER 2 - SIP System Operation

- Protocols
- The Session Initiation Protocol (SIP)
- End User Devices (User Agents)
- Proxy Servers (Call Processors)
- Registrars (Customer Status)
- Location Servers (Address Tracking)
- Redirection Servers (Call Forwarding)

CHAPTER 3 - Basic SIP Communication Services

- Voice Service
- Mobility Management (via Registration)
- Call Hold
- Call Forwarding
- Click To Dial

CHAPTER 4 - Integrating SIP with Existing Phone Systems

- Direct Connect
- Adding VoIP Lines to a Data Network
- Integrated Service
- Replace a System VoIP Lines

CHAPTER 5 - Tying SIP to Other Information Systems

- Order Processing Systems
- Web Servers
- Instant Messaging (IM)
- Web Seminars (Webinar)
- Mobile Communication Information Service
- Database System
- Dispatch Systems
- Security Systems
- Interactive Television

CHAPTER 6 - Building SIP Systems

- SIP System Design
- Hosted SIP Systems
- Internet Telephone Service Provider (ITSP)
- IP Centrex Operators
- SIP Communication Servers
- SIP Administrator
- Call Manager
- Gateway Manager
- Unit Manager
- System Manager
- Translation Server
- User Manager
- Conference Server
- Dial Plan
- Direct Inward Dialing (DID) Assignments
- Hunt Groups
- Attendant Switchboard Console
- Automatic Call Distribution (ACD)
- Voice Mail (VM)

CHAPTER 7 - Managing SIP Systems

Service Provisioning
- System Capacity Allocation
- Policy Server
- Equipment Configuration
- Equipment Firmware
- Testing and Maintenance
- Test Plan
- Network Address Translation (NAT)
- Firewalls
- Integrated System Management

CHAPTER 8 - SIP System Economics

- Equipment Cost
- Software Cost
- Service Cost
- Other Costs

CHAPER 9 - How SIP is Changing

- SIP Extensions
- SIP Toolkits
- Call Processing Scripts and Servlets
- SIP for Instant Messaging and Presence Leveraging Extensions (SIMPLE)
- SIP Info Method Extensions

Index





About the Authors

Mr. Harte has over 29 years of experience in the electronics industry including company leadership, product management, development, marketing, design, and testing of telecommunications (cellular), radar, and microwave systems. He has been issued patents relating to cellular technology. He has authored over 75 articles on related subjects and has been a speaker and panel moderator at industry trade events. Mr. Harte earned executive MBA at Wake Forest University and received his Bachelors degree from University of the State of New York. During the TDMA digital cellular standard development process, Mr. Harte served as an editor and voting company representative for the Telecommunications Industries Association (TIA) TR45.3, digital cellular standards committee. As of 2003, Mr. Harte had authored and co-authored over 20 books relating to telecommunications technology. He has served as a consultant and expert witness for leading companies including Ericsson, Siemens, VLSI, AMD, Casio, Samsung, Sony, ATT, Nokia, Hughes and many others.

Mr. Bowler is an independent telecommunications training consultant. He has almost 20 years experience in designing and delivering training in the areas of wireless networks and related technologies, including CDMA, TDMA, GSM and 3G systems. He also has expertise in Wireless Local Loop and microwave radio systems and has designed and delivered a range of training courses on SS7 and other network signaling protocols. Mr. Bowler has worked for a number of telecommunications operators including Cable and Wireless and Mercury Communications and also for Wray Castle a telecommunications training company where he was responsible for the design of training programmes for delivery on a global basis. Mr. Bowler was educated in the United Kingdom and holds a series of specialized maritime electronic engineering certificates.

Description

This book explains why people and companies are using SIP equipment and software to efficiently upgrade existing telephone systems, develop their own advanced communications services, and to more easily integrate telephone network with company information systems.

SIP technology is a well-established standardized communication protocol that has many low cost devices and software application development tools available. The use of SIP product and software allows companies to cost-effectively upgrade and eventually replace existing (legacy) telephone systems with more cost effective and easy to use telephone equipment. Because SIP is a standardized protocol, this allows end-users and system administrators to have more control and even develop communication services (such as smart voice mail) that have been traditionally been unchangeable and limited. SIP is a text-based protocol (similar to web HTML) and this allows for relatively easy development and integration with existing company information systems to produce new revenue producing services (such as integrating telephone and order processing systems).

Although SIP is an industry standard, not all SIP systems and services are the same. There are cost and quality tradeoffs along with common problem areas and risks. There are many ways SIP systems can reduce telecommunication costs along with the ability to create new revenue producing services. This book will help you to understand what SIP is, how it operates, what services it can provide, and your company can benefit from implementing SIP. Some of the most important topics featured are:

Descriptions of the function parts of SIP systems Fundamentals of how SIP works What key services are possible through the use of SIP How existing phone systems can be upgraded to SIP capabilities Why it is easy to integrate SIP with information systems How to develop new advanced revenue producing services The basic SIP system development process How to manage SIP systems Typical costs of SIP systems How SIP is changing

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