Click to enlargeIntroduction to IP Television<a name="top">

Author: Lawrence Harte

Number of Pages: 104
Number of Diagrams: 46
Copyright: 2005



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Description

This book explains how and why people and companies are using IP television and Internet television services. You will discover how global television services are already available through the Internet and how you can use standard television to watch global television channels using analog television adapter boxes.

The fundamentals of how IP Television works is provided. You will discover how IP television can be watched on different types of viewing devices such as standard televisions with adapters, dedicated IP televisions, multimedia computers and mobile telephones.

IP television service allows viewers to have more control of Internet television services. This control ranges from instant service activation to real time television on demand controls. Some of the advanced Internet television features such as personal media channels, anywhere television extensions, global television channels and more....

Sample Diagrams

There are 46 explanatory diagrams in this book

Internet Television Service Provider (ITVSP)

This figure shows that ITVSPs are primarily made of computers that are connected to the Internet and software to operate IP television and other services. In this diagram, a computer keeps track of which customers are active (registration) and what features and services are authorized. When call requests are processed, the ITVSP sends messages to gateways via the Internet allowing television channel to be connected to IP televisions, analog television adapters (ATVA), or multimedia computers that are connected to a high speed data network (broadband Internet). These gateways transfer their billing details to a clearinghouse so the ITVSP can pay for the gateway's usage. The ITVSP then can use this billing information to charge the customer for access to television programs and other media sources.

IP Video to Multiple Users

This figure shows how much data transfer rate it can take to provide for multiple IP television users in a single building. This diagram shows 3 IP televisions that require 1.8 Mbps to 3.8 Mbps to receive an IP television channel. This means the broadband modem must be capable of providing 5.4 Mbps to 11.4 Mbps to allow up to 3 IP televisions to operate in the same home or building.


Table of Contents

What is Internet and IP Television?

Why Consider IPTV and Internet Television Services
-More Channels
-More Control
-More Services

Viewing IP Television Channels
-Multimedia Computer
-Analog Television Adapters (ATVA)
-IP Television (IP Television)
-Mobile Telephone Television
-Control over IP Television Services
-Instant Activation
-Real Time Accounting and Billing
-Channel Selection

New Television Features and Services
-Anywhere Television Service
-Global Television Channels
-Personal Media Channels (PMC)
-Addressable Advertising
-Television on Demand (ToD)

How IPTV and Internet Television Systems Work
-Digitization - Converting Video Signals and Audio Signals to
-Digital Media Compression Gaining Efficiency
-Sending Packets
Packet Routing Methods
Packet Losses and Effects on Television Quality
Packet Buffering
-Converting Packets to Television Service
Gateways Connect the Internet to Standard Televisions
-Managing the Television Connections
Downloading
Streaming
Switching (Connecting) Media Channels
-Multiple IP Televisions per Home
-Digital Rights Management (DRM)
-Transmission
Unicast
Multicast

IP Television Systems - Control of Service
-Managed IP Television Systems
-Internet Television Service Providers (ITVSPs)
-Private IP Television Systems

IP Television (IPTV) Networks
-Servers
Video Servers
Proxy Servers
Remote Access Dial-In User Server (RADIUS)
Registrar Servers (RAS)
Provisioning Servers
Billing Record Servers
Policy Server
Domain Name Server (DNS)
Web Server
-Gateways
Media Gateways
Signaling Gateways (SG)

Broadband Access Systems for IP Television
-Digital Subscriber Line (DSL)
-Cable Modem
-Wireless Broadband
-Power Line Carrier
-Network Capacity

Television Quality, Security, and Reliability
-Audio Quality
-Video Quality
-Reliability
Access Device Reliability
Data Network Reliability
Data Connection Reliability
ITVSP Server Reliability
Feature Operation Reliability

Premises Distribution
-Wired LAN
-Telephone Wiring Premises Distribution
-Coaxial Cable Premises Distribution
-Wireless LAN Premises Distribution
-Power Line Wiring Premises Distribution

IP Television Challenges
-Content Distribution Rights
-Data Transfer Rate Capability
-Media Player Compatibility
-Channel Changing Time
-Industry Standards
Session Initiation Protocol (SIP)
Motion Picture Experts Group (MPEG)
IGMP

Internet Television Service Provider Costs
-Content Licensing

About the Author

Mr. Mr. Lawrence Harte is the president of Althos, an expert information provider which researches, trains, and publishes on technology and business industries. He has over 29 years of technology analysis, development, implementation, and business management experience. Mr. Harte has worked for leading companies including Ericsson/General Electric, Audiovox/Toshiba and Westinghouse and has consulted for hundreds of other companies. Mr. Harte continually researches, analyzes, and tests new communication technologies, applications, and services. He has authored over 50 books on telecommunications technologies and business systems covering topics such as mobile telephone systems, data communications, voice over data networks, broadband, prepaid services, billing systems, sales, and Internet marketing. Mr. Harte holds many degrees and certificates including an Executive MBA from Wake Forest University (1995) and a BSET from the University of the State of New York (1990).



Description

This book explains how and why people and companies are using IP television and Internet television services. You will discover how global television services are already available through the Internet and how you can use standard television to watch global television channels using analog television adapter boxes.

The fundamentals of how IP Television works is provided. You will discover how IP television can be watched on different types of viewing devices such as standard televisions with adapters, dedicated IP televisions, multimedia computers and mobile telephones.

IP television service allows viewers to have more control of Internet television services. This control ranges from instant service activation to real time television on demand controls. Some of the advanced Internet television features such as personal media channels, anywhere television extensions, global television channels and multimedia programs are described.

In addition to the traditional ways of television channel selection, you will learn about new ways television channels can be search and selected using interactive electronic programming guides (EPGs). The different types of media formats that are used for IP television services are explained along with their control protocols.

Not all IP Television systems and services are the same. There are cost and quality tradeoffs along with common problem areas and risks. You will discover how the audio and video service quality can range from poor to above the quality that is already delivered to standard TV.

Because each IP television viewer has a unique address, this allows advertising messages to be sent to specific viewers (addressable advertising). The ability to direct advertising messages to specific target audiences (addressable advertising) is more valuable to companies than traditional broadcast advertising and this may result in reduced viewing costs.

Some of the most important topics featured are:

Fundamentals of how IP Television works
How to use regular televisions to watch IP TV
Global television channels
Internet television service quality
The costs of IP Television
Control of Internet television services
Internet television service providers
Advanced Internet television features
Electronic programming guides
IP television Media formats


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